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How to Use a Black Light to Identify Reprints and Fakes of Antique Paper Collectibles

Original or Reprint 1933 Goudey Babe Ruth?  A black light can tell you.

Is it an original or Reprint 1933 Goudey Babe Ruth? A black light can tell you.

For collectors of pre-World War II paper memorabilia—whether it’s sports cards, photographs, scorecards, postcards, advertising posters or booklets— there is a sophisticated yet inexpensive and easy to use tool for quickly identifying many modern reprints and fakes. This tool is called a longwave ultraviolet light, better known as a black light. While there are many uses for black light in collecting and beyond, this article shows how it can be used to identify modern paper and card stock. 

How Black Light Works

A black light allows the collector to see things invisible under normal daylight. Ultraviolet light is outside the human’s visible spectrum, meaning it cannot be seen by human eyes. However, in a dark room materials can fluoresce (glow) under black light. Most of us have experienced black lights that make the whites on our shirts or shoes glow brightly. Some materials fluoresce brightly, some not at all and the rest somewhere in between. The fluorescence varies in color. Under ultraviolet light, gemstones and antique glass can fluoresce red, yellow, green, purple, white and orange. The quality of fluorescence happens at the atomic level of the material. With a black light you are doing a scientific test on collectibles.

 Identification of Modern Papers Using Black Light

A black light is effective in identifying many, though not all, modern paper and cardboard stocks.

Starting in the late 1940s, manufacturers of many products began adding `optical brighteners’ and other new chemicals to their products. Optical brighteners are invisible dyes that fluoresce brightly under ultraviolet light. They were used to make products appear brighter in normal daylight, which contains some ultraviolet light. Optical brighteners were added to laundry detergent and clothes to help drown out stains and to give the often advertised `whiter than white whites.’ Optical brighteners were added to plastic toys to makes them brighter and more colorful. Paper manufacturers joined the act as well, adding optical brighteners to many, though not all, of their white papers stocks.

A black light can identify many trading cards, posters, photos and other paper items that contain optical brighteners. In a dark room and under black light optical brighteners will usually fluoresce a very bright light blue or bright white. To find out what this looks like shine a recently made white trading card, family snapshot or most types of today’s computer paper under a black light.

If paper stock fluoresces very bright as just described, it almost certainly was made after the mid 1940s.

A modern 1880s Old Judge reprint fluorescing bright light blue under black light

A modern 1880s Old Judge reprint fluorescing bright light blue under black light

It is important to note that not all modern papers will fluoresce this way as optical brighteners are not added to all modern paper. For example, many modern wire photos have no optical brighteners. This means that if a paper doesn’t fluoresce brightly this does not mean it is necessarily old. However, with few exceptions, if a paper object fluoresces very brightly, it could not have been made before World War II.

The beauty of this black light test is you can use it on items where you are not an expert. You may be no expert on 1920s German Expressionist movie posters, World War I postcards or American Revolutionary War era etchings, but you can still identify many modern reprints of those items.  In the same way, the black light can also identify modern reproduction of antique cloth items, as the white cloth or stitching sometimes fluoresces very brightly it was made after WWII.

Tips on effective use of black light

A black light must be used in a dark room, the darker the better. Take a minute or three to let your eyes get adjusted to the dark. The paper memorabilia being examined should be on something that does not fluoresce. Something that does not fluoresce will appear black under black light. If your background fluoresces too brightly, it can be hard to judge the fluorescence of the memorabilia.

It’s best for the memorabilia to be removed from any top loader, glass, plastic sleeve or other holder. The holder itself can fluoresce or otherwise mask the memorabilia’s fluorescence. Shine the black light on all sides of the memorabilia. Some trading cards and photographs have coatings on one side.

For comparison purposes, you may wish to have a shard of modern computer paper that fluoresces brightly. Between the black table and bright shard, you will have a range on the spectrum for comparison.

The fedora hat's inside tag fluoresces brightly under blacklight, showing that the hat is modern.

The fedora hat’s inside tag fluoresces brightly under blacklight, showing that the hat is modern.

Practice using the black light. See what items from all years look like under black light. Feel free to look at magazines, books, typing paper, glass vases, plastic. Some around the house materials that fluoresce brightly include granular laundry detergent, vaseline and some reading glasses.

Purchasing a black light

The collector should purchase a longwave black light, as opposed to a shortwave or ‘germicidal’ black light. Shortwave is important in a few specialty areas, including identifying stamps and gem stones, but longwave is the safest and all you need for most paper memorabilia. The most common and inexpensive black lights on the market are longwave.

Black lights are widely available and have a wide variety of uses. They are used by geologists, chemists, detectives, art museums, plumbers and even scorpion hunters (scorpions fluoresce). Black lights are sold by many science, hobby or rock stores. They can be purchased online. You will find pocket-sized longwave models on eBay or Amazon for well under $20 each.

The following are common styles of black lights you’ll find. You can pick whichever suits your fancy, as they will all do the job.

Popular style of black light. Portable and runs on batteries.

Popular style of black light. Portable and runs on batteries.

Pocket sized blacklight flashlight.  Fits in the palm of the hand or in your pocket.

Pocket sized LED black light flashlight. Fits in the palm of the hand or in your pocket.

screw in black light light bulb.  Fits into a normal socket.

Screw in black light light bulb. Fits into a normal socket.

 

About David Cycleback

David Cycleback is an art and artifact historian and an internationally known authentication expert. He has advised and examined material for major auction houses and institutions, and was an articles writer for the Encyclopedia of Nineteenth Century Photography. Reprinted by Beijing's Three Shadows Art Center, his guides "Judging the Authenticity of Prints by the Masters" and "Judging the Authenticity of Photographs" were the first comprehensive books on the subjects published in China. You can find his books for sale on eBay here: http://bit.ly/1mixAcg. He can be reached at [email protected].

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  1. […] light), and two previous columns showed how black light is used to authenticate sports cards (see here and here). Some of the biggest forgery cases have been solved in part due to ultraviolet light […]

  2. […] * A previous column showed how to identify modern paper and fakes with a black light. Read it here. […]

  3. […] first story on using black lights to examine authenticity of paper collectibles such as vintage baseball cards was really well […]

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