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Baseball Card Exchange

Upper Deck Earns Court Victory

Upper Deck CompanyAfter losing a couple of high profile cases recently, Upper Deck earned a legal victory when a panel of judges ruled in its favor over the invention of the memorabilia card.

The U.S. Court of Appeals in Washington, D.C. ruled 2-1 that the company did not violate any laws.

The long-running case dates back to the strike-shortened 1994 baseball season when a man named Adrian Gluck patented an idea of attaching a piece of memorabilia to a traditional trading card.

Media Technologies Licensing, which licensed the patents, accused Upper Deck of patent infringement. A U.S. District judge ruled the patents invalid but the case then went to appeal where once again, Upper Deck emerged victorious.

The memorabilia card’s roots in entertainment provided a frame of reference for the decision, which was spelled out in this story.

You can read the Court of Appeals’ decision and related papers below.

Upper Deck Case

About Rich Mueller

Rich is the editor and founder of Sports Collectors Daily. A broadcaster and writer for more than 30 years and a collector for even longer than that, he's usually typing something somewhere. Type him back at [email protected].

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